LinkedIn Statistics: number of Users and Penetration [July 2014]

linkedinstats

On Socialbakers.com you can find LinkedIn Statistics from all their 292,359,048 users.

You can track and monitor the daily LinkedIn user growth and see the daily reports of this social network’s demographics.

Let’s take a look at the distribution of LinkedIn user across the world:

LinkedIn_Users

US clearly dominates the scene, followed by densely-populated country such as India and Brazil. In fact, something more interesting shows up looking at the penetration data:

LinkedIn_Penetration

I’ve been surprised to see Netherlands at 30% of penetration, and Australia around 25%, not to mention Chile that is leading on developed European countries such as Spain, France and Italy.

[Source: Socialbakers]

Teens heavily use Facebook, Instagram more often than Snapchat

One of the most pressing questions about Facebook’s future revolves around teen usage. However, a new study by Forrester shows that maybe teens don’t hate Facebook after all.

Forrester surveyed more than 4,500 U.S. online users between 12 and 17 about their habits on social networks and apps. Among apps they use “all the time,” both Facebook and Instagram finished ahead dof Snapchat.

Nate Elliott, Forrester’s Vice President and Principal Analyst Serving Marketing Leadership Professionals,summed up the findings of the study in a blog post:

The results were clear: Facebook remains young users’ favorite social network. More than three-quarters of online youth use Facebook — twice as many as use Pinterest or Tumblr or Snapchat, and more than use Instagram and WhatApp combined. And 28% of young users who are on Facebook say they use it “all the time,” a higher percentage than said this about any other social network.The bottom line: The sky is not falling. Facebook does not have a problem attracting or retaining teen users.

Here’s a look at the graph, with different apps and social networks used by teens plotted in terms of adoption and hyperusage:

teensocialscatter

[Source: Inside Facebook]

Seven Deadly Sins of Social Media

social7sins

The seven deadly sins: just the mention of the term stirs up feelings of guilt and an urge to right your wrongs. This goes for social media too! When it comes to social media, there are countless examples of individuals and companies making all sorts of mistakes and not using social networks to their full potential. So let’s strike a little fear into your hearts here and show you how the seven deadly sins can have a damning effect on your social media efforts.

1. Gluttony

You are a social media glutton if you try to be everywhere at once. You feel the need to create an account on every social network in existence, regardless of whether or not the network is appropriate for your specific goals.

If you do not know what your social media goals are, start by asking the following questions. Does your target audience use the social network? Do you produce content that the social network can showcase appropriately? What results are you looking to see from being on the social network (i.e. leads, website traffic, exposure, etc.)? Answer these questions for each social network before actually creating your account.

2. Sloth

If you created a social media account and then left it dormant, shame on you! Or perhaps you post some great content to your social media account on a regular basis: great! But what about engaging your audience? Facilitating conversations with your followers?

If you leave your social media accounts inactive or fail to respond to social media interactions, then you are guilty of social media sloth. Sloth is a sure way to have your followers lose interest in you or to give them the impression that you do not care about them as customers or as an audience.

3. Greed

Are you willing to do whatever it takes to gain more followers? Will you pay, lie, cheat, maybe even rent out your firstborn to get your follower counts into the 10K range? If so, then you are guilty of social media greed.

The number of followers on your social media accounts is an important metric in terms of the growth and success of your efforts. Your main focus, however, should remain on producing quality content, nurturing relationships and building a community online.

4. Wrath

Have people criticized or complained about your services via social media? If so, don’t respond in haste. You most definitely should respond, but you have to make sure your response is tactful and not attacking in any way. If your response is mean-spirited or fails to address the complaint, then you are guilty of social media wrath.

Don’t think it’s a bad thing to take your time to calm down and contemplate any criticism on social media. It lets personal offense simmer down so you can see things from the complainer’s perspective. Even if you think responding is futile, according to Kissmetrics 22% of social media complainers welcomed the interaction that resulted from their complaining and later posted a positive response.

5. Lust

If your business is struggling to market itself effectively, you may think that social media will help you out. In fact, you may believe that social media will be the golden ticket to instant success, fame and profits. If your mouth waters at the perceived magic of social media to solve all your marketing problems, then you are guilty of the social media sin of lust.

The truth is social media is a tool that takes time and effort. It’s part of a larger, long-term marketing strategy. Social media is definitely not a quick fix or a panacea for broken or inadequate marketing strategies.

6. Envy

Do you look at others’ social media accounts, large followings and constantly shared content and get an overwhelming desire to be just like them? Then you are guilty of social media envy. No two companies, individuals or organizations are exactly the same, so don’t feel envious just because your competitor is performing a particular way on social media. While it’s a good idea to keep an eye on your competitors on social media to look for opportunities to grow and gain inspiration, it’s not a good idea to copy your competitors under the illusion that you’ll achieve the same results.

7. Pride

Yes, you (hopefully) control your social media accounts. Yes, social media is a tool that can help promote your brand. But no, your social media content cannot be all about you. If so, then you are guilty of the social media sin of pride. If you talk about you, your business or your product all the time or even most of the time, it bores your audience and puts yet another nail in your social media coffin. Instead, mix it up. Remember the 4-1-1 rule: for every self-serving message you post (i.e. promoting an article you wrote or an event you’re hosting), you should share one message from another user and four pieces of others’ original content.

[Source: DashBurst]

Facebook Algorithm Tweaks Drive More Brand Engagement

The “Q1 2014 Social Intelligence Report” (PDF) indicates that Facebook still rules the roost when it comes to social media platforms—engagement is higher on Facebook than on any other platform and is on the rise.

ADI’s report looks at the effect social media has on brands from a paid, owned, and earned perspective. The analysis is based on 260 billion Facebook ad impressions, 226 billion Facebook post impressions, 17 billion referred visits from social networking sites, and 7 billion brand post interactions, including comments, likes, and shares.

“People are clicking through to the ads they are seeing,” said Joe Martin, a senior analyst at ADI. “Click-through rates are up year over year and quarter over quarter. The new Autoplay feature for video seems to be working, as well. There have been huge amounts of video plays, and engagement rates are up. Even though people have expressed frustration over the algorithm changes by Facebook, there’s good news in the data for brands.”

Facebook video plays are up a whopping 758 percent year over year (YoY). Engagement with video posts is up 25 percent YoY and up 58 percent quarter over quarter (QoQ).

Brands are also taking advantage of Facebook’s ad business, which is also growing. According to ADI, Facebook’s ad clicks increased 70 percent YoY and 48 percent QoQ, with ad impressions up 40 percent and 41 percent, respectively. And people are clearly clicking on the ads being served, given that Facebook’s ad click-through rate (CTR) jumped 160 percent YoY and 20 percent QoQ. Also notable: Clicks still outpace impressions on the platform.

ADI’s analysis also found that Fridays are the best-performing day of the week for social media. Consumers post more, like more, and comment more on that day. Additionally, 25 percent of videos played and 15.7 percent of impressions on Facebook take place on Friday. “That’s definitely when marketers should be planning to use their best content because that’s when you’ll get the most engagement,” Martin said.

Twitter (5 percent) and Facebook (11 percent) referred revenue-per-visitor (RPV) also increased in the first quarter. According to Martin, LinkedIn stood out with a 15 percent share of social traffic to B2B high-tech sites. Only Facebook drove more traffic (52 percent) to B2B high-tech sites in Q1.

“Facebook is back at the top of the mountain,” Martin said. “It was declining for some time, but now it’s at about 75 percent of retail referrer traffic, for example. All the other networks are still growing, but the majority of referring traffic is still attributed to Facebook. That means that Facebook’s adaptions for marketers are working.”

 

[Source: Adobe Index]