Seven Deadly Sins of Social Media

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The seven deadly sins: just the mention of the term stirs up feelings of guilt and an urge to right your wrongs. This goes for social media too! When it comes to social media, there are countless examples of individuals and companies making all sorts of mistakes and not using social networks to their full potential. So let’s strike a little fear into your hearts here and show you how the seven deadly sins can have a damning effect on your social media efforts.

1. Gluttony

You are a social media glutton if you try to be everywhere at once. You feel the need to create an account on every social network in existence, regardless of whether or not the network is appropriate for your specific goals.

If you do not know what your social media goals are, start by asking the following questions. Does your target audience use the social network? Do you produce content that the social network can showcase appropriately? What results are you looking to see from being on the social network (i.e. leads, website traffic, exposure, etc.)? Answer these questions for each social network before actually creating your account.

2. Sloth

If you created a social media account and then left it dormant, shame on you! Or perhaps you post some great content to your social media account on a regular basis: great! But what about engaging your audience? Facilitating conversations with your followers?

If you leave your social media accounts inactive or fail to respond to social media interactions, then you are guilty of social media sloth. Sloth is a sure way to have your followers lose interest in you or to give them the impression that you do not care about them as customers or as an audience.

3. Greed

Are you willing to do whatever it takes to gain more followers? Will you pay, lie, cheat, maybe even rent out your firstborn to get your follower counts into the 10K range? If so, then you are guilty of social media greed.

The number of followers on your social media accounts is an important metric in terms of the growth and success of your efforts. Your main focus, however, should remain on producing quality content, nurturing relationships and building a community online.

4. Wrath

Have people criticized or complained about your services via social media? If so, don’t respond in haste. You most definitely should respond, but you have to make sure your response is tactful and not attacking in any way. If your response is mean-spirited or fails to address the complaint, then you are guilty of social media wrath.

Don’t think it’s a bad thing to take your time to calm down and contemplate any criticism on social media. It lets personal offense simmer down so you can see things from the complainer’s perspective. Even if you think responding is futile, according to Kissmetrics 22% of social media complainers welcomed the interaction that resulted from their complaining and later posted a positive response.

5. Lust

If your business is struggling to market itself effectively, you may think that social media will help you out. In fact, you may believe that social media will be the golden ticket to instant success, fame and profits. If your mouth waters at the perceived magic of social media to solve all your marketing problems, then you are guilty of the social media sin of lust.

The truth is social media is a tool that takes time and effort. It’s part of a larger, long-term marketing strategy. Social media is definitely not a quick fix or a panacea for broken or inadequate marketing strategies.

6. Envy

Do you look at others’ social media accounts, large followings and constantly shared content and get an overwhelming desire to be just like them? Then you are guilty of social media envy. No two companies, individuals or organizations are exactly the same, so don’t feel envious just because your competitor is performing a particular way on social media. While it’s a good idea to keep an eye on your competitors on social media to look for opportunities to grow and gain inspiration, it’s not a good idea to copy your competitors under the illusion that you’ll achieve the same results.

7. Pride

Yes, you (hopefully) control your social media accounts. Yes, social media is a tool that can help promote your brand. But no, your social media content cannot be all about you. If so, then you are guilty of the social media sin of pride. If you talk about you, your business or your product all the time or even most of the time, it bores your audience and puts yet another nail in your social media coffin. Instead, mix it up. Remember the 4-1-1 rule: for every self-serving message you post (i.e. promoting an article you wrote or an event you’re hosting), you should share one message from another user and four pieces of others’ original content.

[Source: DashBurst]

Icons of the Web: the top million web sites for 2013

Icons of the Web from the open source Nmap Security Scanner Project (http://nmap.org)is an update to the hugely popular project from 2010. This update brings all new data, a n updated interactive viewer and printed posters available for sale through Kickstarter for a limited time (until January 17th!)

Icons of the Web

[Source: Icons of the Web]

State of Social Media 2013

What a wild year it’s been. You could say that 2013 was the year of social media and you’d be correct. What was once a novelty for people bored and surfing on the ‘net has risen to be an industry in and of itself that companies large and small have embraced around the world as a powerful cornerstone of their marketing initiatives.In case you got lost in the details of 2013, we’ve laid out all the notable moments of the year, month by month, in this handy infographic.What was the most notable social media moment in your life in 2013? Let us know in the comments.

[Source: infographicpromotion]

Majority of Consumers Happy to Share Mobile Location Data with Trusted Brands

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mBlox, the leader in mobile business to person engagement, today announced new findings from a survey conducted by Millward Brown Digital in eight countries that show consumers welcome location-based engagement with companies via mobile devices. Plus, the findings reveal 59% of global respondents prefer SMS and push campaigns over other forms of mobile marketing, including video advertising, banner or standard display ads, and email.

The survey revealed 80% of respondents would share location data with brands in order to receive SMS or push messages. However, while consumers indicated they are open to receiving these messages, most prefer opportunities with known or favorite brands and want to ensure the messages contain relevant marketing opportunities, alerts and notices that they have opted-in to receive.

When asked why they would share location data with a company:

47 percent would do so in order to receive relevant offers or discount coupons

45 percent would do so in order to receive information they have requested

36 percent would do so in order to help them solve customer service issues

24 percent would do so in order to check-in or post on social networking sites

Also according to the survey, 58 percent of global respondents say they would send a text message to a company to request more information, and 54 percent of global respondents say they would send a text message to a company to enter a competition. Given that only 1 in 5 marketers sent an SMS message last year according to Chief Marketer, the survey results indicate that SMS messages are an effective mobile engagement tactic preferred by people but underutilized by marketers.

“These findings show that mobile marketers have a tremendous opportunity to utilize mobile messaging as a preferred channel for highly personalized, micro-targeted marketing campaigns,” said Michael Becker, mobile evangelist and Marketing Development for North America, Somo, a full-service mobile solutions company. “They also show that marketers should use the channel with care, that trust and message value are critical to consumers, and that marketers must strategically utilize consumer preference, behavior and location data in their design to ensure effectiveness.”

The findings have important implications for marketers. According to The Guardian, over four billion people send text messages, which means SMS has more users than Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn combined. Additionally, recent data from the IDG Global Solutions 2013 Mobile Survey reveals that 83 percent of global survey respondents own or use a mobile device, and 56 percent of smartphone and 73 percent of tablet owners or users have made a purchase using their mobile device. Mobile gives marketers access a large global reach and has a high-propensity to encourage purchases, and SMS and push marketing better engages people in a way that is consistent with their preferences.

“As the Millward Brown Digital survey shows, the majority of people today find value in targeted, relevant SMS and push messages sent by a company,” said mBlox CEO Tom Cotney. “When consumers are telling you they want to, if not expect to, be contacted just by downloading an app, it would be foolish not to take advantage of that. If you’re a marketer, why wouldn’t you engage people via the channel and methods they prefer?”

Additional findings from the survey include:

68 percent of global respondents and 66 percent of U.S. respondents find SMS or push messages sent to them from a company to be valuable

57 percent of global respondents and 60 percent of U.S. respondents find SMS and push messages more likely to persuade them to make a purchase than other forms of marketing on a mobile device, including advertising commercials or video advertising, banner or standard display advertising, and email marketing messages

75 percent of global respondents and 75 percent of U.S. respondents are likely to read or engage with SMS and push marketing messages, such as location-triggered coupons, updates or deals relevant to the mobile apps downloaded

Methodology:

Millward Brown Digital surveyed a collective 1,572 mobile users over the age of 18 who had downloaded an app in the past 12 months in the following countries: the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, France, Germany, Spain, and Italy. The research was fielded between July 16, 2013 and July 24, 2013.

[Source: mBlox]

The Conversation Prism v4.0

What’s different from 3.0?

Well, version 4.0 brings about some of the most significant changes since the beginning. In this round, we moved away from the flower-like motif to simplify and focus the landscape. With all of the changes in social media, it would have been easier to expand the lens. Instead, we narrowed the view to focus on those that are on a path to mainstream understanding or acceptance.

The result was the removal of 122 services while only adding 111.

This introduces an opportunity for a series of industry or vertical-specific Prisms to be introduced so stay tuned.

ConversationPrism_2880x1800

[Source: The Conversation Prism]