Welcome Cinemagraph: the new fascinating visual trend that will change Advertising and Marketing

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What if there were an ad that you just couldn’t draw your eyes from? It’s oddly captivating, almost hypnotic, and it would halt your thumb from scrolling farther down your Facebook feed.

There’s one such creative format that is only now catching on as the digital world’s equivalent of the glossy magazine ad: cinemagraphs. And Facebook, along with its mobile photo network Instagram, wants more brands to try them out as it quietly introduces advertisers to the potential of this half-video, half-photograph style, according to digital marketing insiders.

“You’re going to start seeing a ton of these on Facebook,” said one advertising executive who has seen a guide produced by Facebook for marketers called “Hacking Facebook Autoplay.”

Cinemagraphs have been around for a few years, made popular by two artists well-known in ad circles, Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck (who created the Armani eyeglasses image above). The format is a type of GIF, a photo in which only a piece of the image subtly moves.

A cinemagraph created for Balenciaga by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

 

The style has been used in ads on Tumblr created by Burg and Beck, and now Facebook is giving it a whirl.

“Because of autoplay, brands need to be doing more with this stuff,” the ad exec noted. “This is something that plays out with motion in the feed that’s cool.”

Some brands already have shared cinemagraph-style posts to Facebook, including Stouffer’s and Coca-Cola. One of the common uses is to depict steam wafting off a hot dish, for instance.

Facebook has only been able to support such creative because of its autoplaying video, which sets images in motion without users having to click a button. “Advertisers buy it just like video,” the ad insider explained.

A cinemagraph created at Inkaterra La Casona by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

Just last week, Facebook updated Instagram to allow videos to play on a loop, which could help brands post cinemagraphs there because they are set to constantly repeat.

Burg and Beck have done Tumblr ads for Saks Fifth Avenue and Lincoln Motor Co. It’s helped luxury brands like Chopard with creating cinemagraphs for organic social campaigns.

The duo said they were just playing around when they discovered this idea of “isolated motion,” Burg said in a phone interview this week.

They thought the format would be ideal for advertising. “People can’t stop staring at them,” Burg said. “Isn’t that what advertisers want?”

A third of the projects they do with brands include cinemagraphs, and the artist agreed that their clients are just now planning how to get them on Facebook and Instagram.

A cinemagraph created for Ecco Domani by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

 

Burg and Beck have even talked with Facebook’s team to consult on projects because of how complicated the format is. It could take weeks in production to create a cinemagraph, they said.

“We’ve had all kinds of new inquiries [from brands],” Beck said. “They don’t want video that’s so noisy; they want a cinemagraph because it has more elegance.”

A cinemagraph created for Lincoln by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio

[Source: Adweek]

2015 Worldwide Trends and Data for Digital, Social and Mobile [Global + 30 Country Reports]

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The wonderful folks at GlobalWebIndex have been great partners to WeAreSocial over the years, most recently helping them to put together a superlative report on digital stats from around the world.

Look through We Are Social’s comprehensive new Digital, Social and Mobile Worldwide in 2015 report, and it’s clear why fast-growth markets are now so important to digital and social trends: regions such as APAC and LatAm contain online populations which are not only vast in size but which are growing at phenomenal year-on-year rates.

What’s more, GlobalWebIndex’s data shows that digital consumers in these fast-growth/emerging markets are some of the most engaged when it comes to online behaviour. They’ve been tracking the daily time that people spend on various forms of media since 2012; by asking 170,000 annual respondents how long they typically devote to the internet as well as online and offline forms of TV, press and radio, they’ve been able to build a detailed profile of daily media behaviors. The results show that the internet is capturing more and more of our time each day – with total hours spent online via PCs, laptops, mobiles and tablets growing from 5.55 in 2012 to 6.15 in 2014.

One of the drivers of this is still-increasing levels of engagement with social networks, which have climbed from a daily average of 1.61 to 1.72 hours over the period in question. This offers important food-for-thought given that some commentators still like to proclaim the “end of social networking”. In actual fact, we’re spending more time on networks now than in the earlier part of the decade – with the rise of the mobile internet, and the ability it affords us to connect to a still-widening range of networks at any time and from any location, being a major driver of this.

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Click image to enlarge: Average number of hours per day spent using social networks, by country. NB: GlobalWebIndex have calculated these average times using data for all internet users (including those who do not use social media at all), whereas the figures in We Are Social’s Digital, Social, & Mobile 2015 report are averages based on the same source data, but which do not include the data for non-social media users.

That said, engagement with social networking can vary significantly from country-to-country. Typically, it is highest in fast-growth/emerging nations where online populations are skewed towards young, urban and affluent demographics (all of these being characteristics which increase an individual’s likelihood of being a social networker).

The Philippines posts the highest figure of all (with a sizeable 3.42 hours), but LatAm countries follow very closely behind. It’s hardly a surprise that there’s a very strong correlation with usage of the mobile internet here; where the mobile web scores well, we typically see social networking accounting for large amounts of daily media time too.

At the other end of the spectrum, we find the lowest amounts of time being devoted to networks in a number of mature markets; here, internet penetration rates are normally very high, meaning the corresponding online populations have a much broader / higher age profile, and are more representative of the country’s total population.

In short, older segments are better represented in mature nations but are some of the least enthusiastic about social networking – something which has an obvious impact on national averages. Japan appears at the very bottom of the table, with just 0.30 hours spent on networking per day; the lack of enthusiasm for networks generally – and for Facebook in particular – are key local factors in this market. Behind this are other mature APAC markets such as Australia as well as most of the European countries tracked by GWI.

Given these geographic and demographic patterns, it’s hardly a surprise that internet users in fast-growth nations are also the biggest “multi-networkers” (those who maintain accounts on the highest number of social platforms). Indonesia tops the table here, with internet users typically being members of 7.39 networks, but it’s in China where people are most likely to actively use the greatest number of social networks (4.27 per internet user). That there are so many local platforms in China is a major contributor to this, as is the fact that leading global names such as Facebook are not as off-limits as is often assumed.

In some studies – especially those based on data from passively collected analytics – it’s still common to see Chinese usage of Facebook, Twitter and similar sites recorded as zero. This is a major mistake; there are in fact a number of ways that Chinese internet users are bypassing official restrictions on social networks, including accessing via apps (16% in China say that they have used the Facebook app in the last 30 days, and a look at the top apps being downloaded in China on a daily basis shows that Western social networks feature very prominently within the list).

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Click image to enlarge: Average number of active social media accounts maintained by internet users, broken down by age and by country.

Significantly, VPN (Virtual Private Network) apps are also being widely downloaded in China – with these tools representing the other major access route for those Chinese users looking to bypass official restrictions. Close to a fifth of online adults in China in fact say they’ve used a VPN in order to access restricted websites or social platforms.

Not only does this trend underline the potential limitations of using passively collected, geo-located data in isolation – which can over-estimate the size of social audiences in markets such as the USA, Netherlands, South Korea and Sweden, where VPN and Proxy servers tend to be located – it also emphasizes the growing futility of attempting to prevent national audiences from accessing certain sites. Most clearly of all, though, it demonstrates why networking behaviors in China – as well as in many other fast-growth markets – are much more diversified and sophisticated than is often assumed.

[Source: We Are Social]

Mountain View wins the award for longest Online Porn sessions on average for an American city [XXX World 4]

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The award for longest Pornhub sessions on average for an American city goes to Mountain View, CA where they somehow manage to last a marathoning 21 minutes per session

I still wonder why Cupertino’s cousins shows only a disappointing 8:58 stamina… maybe a side effect of “one Apple a day”?

Lets’ warm up this freezing traditional Xmas time with a brand new article from my XXX World section.

Who last the longest? And yes, there’s plenty of date for countries and cities all over the world!

Don’t be scared about the topic, it’s absolutely SFW.

Ever wonder how your lasting time compares to others around the world? The Pornhub statisticians have got you covered. As a part of a special collaboration with Gizmodo, we’ve got the dirt on the longest and shortest comings and goings on the world’s biggest porn site. The following infographic allows you to click through and see how long on average Porhub users around the world spend on the site by country and US state, as well as by city again on both the international and individual state levels. The data used was compiled over the Fall of 2014.

View the full sized infograph here

Who lasts the longest of them all? That honor goes to The Western Sahara up in North Africa, where visits last an impressive  16 minutes and 16 seconds on average. China and the Philippines also have some admirable lasting power, clocking in with 14:34 and 14:22 minute long sessions on average. Session lengths drop by around 60% comparatively when we head over the the Middle East, home to some of the shortest Pornhub visits in the world. Bottom 3 worldwide are Palestine, Iraq and Antarctica each only last around 5 minutes.

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If you’ve ever been curious about how long some of the world’s major metropolises masturbation sessions tend to last, look no further than to this relevantly themed section of the interactive infograph. Sessions span a leisurely 13:58 minutes over in Kingston, Jamaica, and over in the US, Los Angeles lasts around 10 minutes and 44 seconds per session. The good times continue to last in Johannesburg, South Africa with visits lasting around 10:35, outlasting Canada’s capital of fap, Edmonton, clocking in at 10:27. Efficiency rules in Baghdad where sessions are the shortest on average in the world, generally lasting only 5:32. Tokyo only goes for around 6 and a half minutes while Istanbul lasts a mere 7:21 on average.

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Over in the land of the free, visits to Pornhub never really dip under 9 minutes on average. In Arizona, where sessions are the shortest in the country on average at 9:21, they still have a noteworthy near 4 minute gain over Baghdad. Pornhub visits span the longest in Hawaii, where they go for around 11 and a half minutes on the regular as is the case in the Southeastern states of the country such as Georgia, Arkansas and Mississippi, where they tend to last around 11 minutes on the site. The award for longest Pornhub sessions on average for an American city goes to Mountain View, CA where they somehow manage to last a marathoning 21 minutes per session, which blows New York City’s average of 10:05 right out of the Hudson. NYC’s average time still more than doubles Plainview, Nebraska’s mere 4:37 average session duration.

That’s a wrap! Let us know what you think of these findings in the comments section below.

[Source: Pornhub Insights]

Social is more important than Search, bigger than most TV networks and deeply interconnected with Mobile

Although it is still relatively new as far as media entities go, BuzzFeed has become one of the leading new-media players, thanks in large part to its command of the social web, an ability to craft viral content and a large fan base among millennials. True to form, the company has created a visually-rich index of factsabout its size and reach — numbers which help explain how it was able to raise $50 million in a recent financing round.

As a caveat, it’s worth noting that the presentation is clearly designed to be a sales pitch for the company’s native advertising efforts, and so there are no links to or discussion of any of the data used to compile the charts. Most of the figures come courtesy of the site’s Google Analytics data, or from firms like Nielsen and comScore.

One of the core principles behind BuzzFeed is that social sharing is more important than search, so it’s no surprise that the main driver of traffic (which is estimated to be about 150 million unique visitors per month) is social — in fact, the company says that its social traffic is five times larger than its search traffic.

Search vs. Social2

Although social has grown to become one of the leading sources of traffic to most web content, the advertising industry still hasn’t quite caught up to this development, as shown by a BuzzFeed graph courtesy of eMarketer and Shareaholic — which says that social accounts for 30 percent of referral traffic but only 14 percent of advertising budgets.

Search vs. social

The other major shift in content consumption is mobile, and according to BuzzFeed the two are interconnected, in the sense that a majority of the site’s social traffic comes from mobile, and its share rates on mobile are twice as high as they are from its desktop users.

Mobile and social

BuzzFeed said mobile also accounts for a rapidly growing amount of video consumption, including 50 percent of all the video that the site produces, and this is particularly the case among millennial users. As a result of its focus on that market, BuzzFeed says that its reach is larger than several leading TV networks, including Fox, CNN and MTV — and among millennials it is larger still, putting the site ahead of most of the major networks, including NBC.

BuzzFeed reach

Obviously, BuzzFeed’s statistics are designed to promote its advertising appeal. And as with any form of web measurement, the sources it has chosen have their flaws — Google Analytics has a tendency to over-estimate certain kinds of traffic, while Nielsen and comScore have a tendency to under-estimate other kinds, including traffic from corporate networks (and BuzzFeed founder Jonah Peretti has said one of his secret weapons is the “bored at work” network).

Some of the conclusions suggested by the BuzzFeed numbers are also debatable: for example, some media analysts argue that social is not as good as search — even if the raw traffic number is larger — because search is a better indicator of purchasing intent. As for video views, TV insiders would no doubt argue that their viewership is more loyal than someone watching a viral video on their mobile device.

Those caveats aside, however, the numbers BuzzFeed is generating are still quite impressive for what is still a relatively young company.

[Source: GigaOM and BuzzFeed]

3 hot-topics for your eCommerce: Social Users, Webrooming and Showrooming

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2014 has seen the most concerted efforts so far by some of the world’s biggest social networks to integrate e-commerce into their platforms. And, as a recent GWI Commerce report shows, it’s a move which is likely to resonate with significant sections of the social audience.
Globally, 7 in 10 active Facebook users say they have bought a product online in the past month, with the equivalent figure among Twitter’s active user base climbing to approach the three-quarter mark.
What’s more, a quarter of internet users say that social network-based retail stores make them more likely to purchase online – with a notable peak among Twitter users. In this context, it’s not hard to see why both Twitter and Facebook are trialing ‘Buy’ buttons in the hopes of opening up new and lucrative revenue streams.

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Let’s also take a look at the impact of webrooming (where products are researched online but bought in-store) and showrooming (when items are tested in-store and then purchased online).
With the chart looking at the ratio of online researchers to buyers across nearly 30 different product categories, it’s clear that there are some big differences in evidence.
Where the ratio is above 1 – meaning there are more researchers than purchasers – the products in question are susceptible to webrooming. Perhaps unsurprisingly, this is most likely to be taking place for big-ticket items such as cars, laptops, mobile phones, tablets and games consoles. Internet users might be discovering and researching them online, but the purchase journey is being completed inside a physical retail environment – whether to take advantage of customer service, to “test” the product or to gain a sense of reassurance about their financial outlay.
In contrast, many other categories have more purchasers than researchers and hence have a ratio below 1. Some of these products are simply too low in value, or else are purchased so habitually or on the basis of deals, that no research is necessary. But there are others where a degree of showrooming is likely to be taking place – as with clothes and shoes. Evidently, some consumers are using retail stores to find correct styles and sizes, but then purchasing the products online to get the best prices. And this is a trend that’s likely to have special importance as we approach the Christmas period when people invest greater amounts of time and energy in locating the best presents.

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