Teens, Social, Mobile & Technology Overview 2015

teens social mobile

Mobile Access Shifts Social Media Use and Other Online Activities

Accessing the internet on mobile devices

The survey shows that 91% of teens go online from a mobile device, at least occasionally. African-American teens are significantly more likely than whites or Hispanics to use mobile devices to go online — with nearly all African-American youth in the study reporting mobile internet access at least occasionally, while 90% of white and 91% of Hispanic teens go online on-the-go.

91% of Teens Use the Internet on a Mobile Device

Internet use is a near ‘constant’ for some teens

Teens ages 13 to 17 are also going online frequently. Aided by the convenience and constant access provided by mobile phones, 92% of teens report going online daily — with 24% using the internet “almost constantly,” 56% going online several times a day, and 12% reporting once-a-day use. Just 6% of teens report going online weekly, and 2% go online less often.

Frequency of Internet Use by Teens

Much of this frenzy of access is facilitated by mobile phones — particularly smartphones. Nearly three-quarters (73%) of teens have a smartphone while just 12% of teens 13 to 17 say they have no cell phone of any type. Fully 91% of teens go online from mobile devices at least occasionally, and 94% of these mobile teens go online daily or more often, compared with 68% of teens who do not use mobile devices to go online.

African-American and Hispanic youth report going online with greater frequency than white teens. About a third (34%) of African-American teens and 32% of Hispanic teens report going online “almost constantly,” while 19% of white teens go online that often. White teens are more likely to say they go online several times a day — the most commonly expressed frequency of internet access across all groups.

Youth from well-to-do families go online more frequently than youth from the least wealthy households; nearly all (93%) teens from homes earning more than $30,000 annually go online daily, compared with 86% of those from households earning $30,000 or less.

Texting

33% of Teens with Cell Phones Use

Texting has undergone a change in the past several years with the advent of smartphone-based messaging apps that have added features and changed the cost, message length and other structures around sending short messages. Fully 91% of teen cell owners use text messaging — either directly through their mobile phones or through an app or a website.

In a testament to the shifting landscape of texting, one third (33%) of teens with cell phones use messaging apps like Kik or WhatsApp. These apps are more likely to be used by Hispanic and African-American youth who own cell phones, with 46% of Hispanic teens and 47% of African-American teens using messaging apps to send texts, compared with one-quarter (24%) of white teens with cell phones. Teens on the lower end of the income spectrum are also more likely to use messaging apps on their smartphones, with 39% of cell-owning teens from households earning less than $50,000 annually using the apps, compared with 31% of teens from wealthier families. Girls are also a bit more likely than boys to use messaging apps, with 37% of cell-owning girls using them compared with 29% of boys with cell phones. Use of these apps varies little by the age of the teen.

The number of text messages sent or received by cell phone owning teens ages 13 to 17 (directly through phone or on apps on the phone) on a typical day is 30. The number of messages exchanged for girls is higher, typically sending and receiving 40 messages a day. And for the oldest girls (15 to 17), this rises to a median of 50 messages exchanged daily.

Among teens with cell phones, those from less well-off families are more likely than others to report that they simply don’t send text messages. Some 18% of teens from families earning less than $30,000 annually report that they do not text, compared with less than 7% for those in higher-earning families.

A Typical Teen Sends and Receives 30 Texts a Day

Girls Dominate Visually-Oriented Social Media Platforms

Online Pinboards

Online pinboards are sites like Pinterest or Polyvore where users can “pin” online content to create highly visual displays of images and information for inspiration, purchase or construction. One-in-five teens — 22% — use online pinboards. Girls, especially older ones, are the major users of these sites, with 33% of girls and 11% of boys using the boards. A quarter of older teens pin on pinboards as do 16% of younger teens. The oldest girls ages 15 to 17 are the most likely to pin, with 38% using online boards.

33% of Girls Use Online Pinboards; 11% of Boys Use Them

Discussion boards

One-in-six teens (17%) read or comment on discussion boards like reddit or Digg. There are few differences among teens in use of these online boards by age or gender or any other major demographic category.

17% of Teens Read or Comment on Online Discussion Boards

Anonymous apps and sites

11% of Cell-Owning Teens Use Anonymous Sharing or Question Apps

Whisper, Yik Yak and Ask.FM are three examples of anonymous sharing apps or sites where individuals can ask questions or post confessional text or images anonymously. Just 11% of teens with cell phones report using anonymous question or sharing apps. Girls are a bit more likely to visit these sites than boys, with 13% of girls with cell phones using anonymous sharing or question sites while 8% of boys with cell phones report the same. Hispanic teens are nearly twice as likely as white teens to use these platforms, with 16% of Hispanic youth using anonymous sharing or question platforms compared with 9% of whites. And just 6% of the least well-off teens (those whose parents earn less $30,000 a year) visit anonymous sites, compared with 12% of teens from more well-to-do homes.

Playing video games

Nearly three-quarters (72%) of teens play video games online or on their phone — 84% of boys and 59% of girls — play such games. African-American teens are substantially more likely to report playing video games than their white or Hispanic counterparts; 83% of African-American teens play games compared with 71% of white and 69% of black teens.6 Teens who play video games cross the socio-economic spectrum evenly, with little variation by family income or education.

72% of teens play video games

Video call and chat

Some 47% of teens talk with others over video connections such as Skype, Oovoo, Facetime and Omegle. Older girls are the most enthusiastic chatters with 54% of them video calling or chatting with others compared with 44% of all other teens. And 53% of Hispanic teens video chat and call, a bit more than the 43% of white teens who report talking by video.

47% of Teens Use Video Calling or Chats

Social Media

Teens are enthusiastic users of social media sites and apps. When asked a general question about whether they used social media, three-quarters (76%) of teens use social media, and 81% of older teens use the sites, compared with 68% of teens 13 to 14.

When asked about seven specific sites (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Tumblr, Google+ and Vine), and given the option to report another site used, 89% of all teens reported that they used at least one of the sites and two-thirds of teens (71%) reported using two or more sites. Among the 18% of teens who only use one site, 66% use Facebook, 13% use Google+ and 13% use Instagram. Just 3% of the single site users use Snapchat, and another 2% say they use a site we didn’t ask about in the list, including Wattpad (a reading site), Youtube, Oovoo and ifunny, among others. Less than 2% (each) report using Twitter, Vine or Tumblr as their sole social media platform. Below is an analysis of teens’ use of social media, organized by major platform.

Facebook

71% of Teens are Facebook Users

Facebook is the most popular of all the social media platforms included in the survey, with 71% of all teens saying they use Facebook. Boys and girls are equally likely to report using the platform, but older users ages 15 to 17 are more likely to use it than younger users 13 to 14. Much of the difference is located within the youngest age group — the 13-year-olds — of whom less than half (44%) say they use Facebook, while of 77% of 14- to 17-year-olds report use.

Teens from somewhat less well-off households are more likely to report using Facebook than teens from wealthier homes; 77% of teens from families earning less than $50,000 annually use Facebook, while 68% of teens from households earning more say they use the platform.

Use of Facebook is relatively consistent across racial and ethnic groups. Urban teens report more use of Facebook than teens from the suburbs, with 77% of urban teens on the site, compared with two-thirds (67%) of suburban teens.

Adult use of Facebook has plateaued in recent years, with 71% of online adults using the site. However, Facebook’s user base remains quite active, with 70% of Facebook users engaging with the site daily. For more details on adult use of Facebook, please read Social Media Update 2014.

Facebook users typically have 145 friends

A Typical Facebook User Has 145 Facebook Friends

Among Facebook-using teens, the typical teen has 145 Facebook friends. Breaking it down, the largest group of teens — 30% — say they have Facebook networks of 0 to 100 friends. Another 12% report networks of 101-200 friends and 9% say 201 to 300 friends. And 15% say they have more than 300 friends. Tellingly, one-third of teens say they are not sure how many Facebook friends they have. Analyzing typical (median) friend counts for different subgroups of Facebook-using teens, we see some substantial variations. Boys report 100 friends to girls’ 175. Young teens 13 to 14 typically report smaller networks (91 friends) compared with older teens 15 to 17 who typically have 168 friends. Networks vary in typical size from 84 amongst the youngest boys to 200 friends among girls 15 to 17.

Instagram

First launched in 2010, Instagram has become a mainstay for adolescent social media users. More than half (52%) of all teens report using Instagram to share photos and video with friends, with girls substantially more likely to use it than boys (61% to 44%). Much of the difference between boys and girls is accounted for by the youngest boys (ages 13 to 14) of whom only 33% use Instagram, compared with half of older boys (ages 15 to 17) and more than half of the younger girls. The heaviest users of Instagram are the oldest girls of whom 64% share photos on Instagram.

Half of American Teens Use Instagram

The typical teen’s Instagram network has 150 followers.

A Typical Instagram-Using Teen Has 150 Followers

The typical American teen who uses Instagram has 150 followers in their network. Girls outpace boys in their typical number of followers, with girls reporting a median of 200 followers on Instagram compared with 100 followers for boys. There is little variation in the number of followers between younger and older cohorts of teens. And fully 39% of Instagramming teens are not sure how many followers they have.

Use of Instagram is not just confined to teens; 21% of American adults use the photo and video sharing platform. As with Twitter, young adults ages 18 to 29 are the most likely to use Instagram. The service is also popular with adult women, Hispanics, African-Americans, and urban and suburban dwellers. For more data on adult use of Instagram, please visit our Social Media Update 2014.

Snapchat

Snapchat is another relatively new photo and video focused sharing app that teens have embraced in the last two and half years. Two-in-five American teens (41%) use Snapchat to share images and videos that are then automatically deleted within a predetermined amount of time — usually a few seconds. (At least that is the way the firm describes how the service works. In practice, there are many workarounds that allow viewers to capture images.) By a wide margin, girls and older teens are the most likely to send snaps — with half of girls using the service, compared with 31% of boys. Similarly, 47% of older teens 15 to 17 send snaps, while 31% of younger teens do so. Older girls are the most likely of any teen group to use to service, with 56% using Snapchat. Teens from the lowest income households earning less than $30,000 per year are the least likely to use the service, with 30% of them sending snaps, while 43% of wealthier teens send them.

41% of Teens are Snapchat Users

Twitter

A third (33%) of all teens use Twitter. Older teens are more likely to use the service than younger, with use rising steadily as teens age, from just 13% of 13-year-olds using the service to 28% of 14-year-olds and 43% of 17-year-olds. The oldest girls ages 15 to 17 are the most likely to use Twitter with nearly half of them (49%) using it. This study does not show statistically significant differences by race, locale or a teen’s socio-economic status.

33% of American Teens Use Twitter

Typical Twitter users have 95 followers.

Typical Twitter-using Teens Have 95 Twitter Followers

Among teens who use Twitter, the typical Twitter user has 95 followers — though 44% of teen Twitterers are not sure how many followers they have. Digging deeper into subgroups of teens, girls outpace boys in numbers of followers, with the typical girl reporting 116 followers to 61 for the typical boy. The differences are even more extreme between younger teens and older; 13- and 14- year-olds report a median of 30 followers compared with 103 followers for older teens.

Among all adults 18 and older, 19% use Twitter. Young adults 18 to 29 are the most likely to use the platform with 37% using the service. Since 2013, Twitter has seen growth among whites, men, those earning $50,000 or more, college graduates and urban dwellers. For more data on use of Twitter by adults, please see our Social Media Update 2014.

Google+

Google+ is a social network that comes as a part of a suite of Google-offered tools through an account on the service. A third of teens (33%) say they use Google+. Hispanic teens are more likely to use Google+ than white or African-American youth; 48% of Hispanic youth use Google+, compared to a little more than one-quarter (26%) of white teens and 29% of African-American teenagers.

And teens from families with somewhat lower levels of education (parents with a high school diploma or some college experience) are more likely to use the service (35%) than teens from families with parents with a college degree, where a bit more than one quarter (27%) of teens report a Google+ account. Given that schools are increasingly adopting Gmail and other Google tools to use with students in and out of school, many youth have access to Google+ through tools for school work.

33% of Teens Use Google+

Vine

Roughly one quarter of teens (24%) use Vine, an app that allows users to record and share short, six-second videos. Vine is used by more girls than boys, with 27% of young women using the app compared with 20% of young men. As with many social photo and video platforms, the oldest girls ages 15 to 17 are the most likely to use Vine, with 29% of them reporting use. Use of Vine is evenly spread across income groups, education, and racial and ethnic groups.

24% of American Teens Use Vine

Tumblr

Tumblr is a microblogging service where users can curate and share posts of mostly visual content they create themselves or find elsewhere on the web. About one-in-seven (14%) teens use Tumblr. Tumblr is predominately used by girls in this age group with 23% of girls 13 to 17 using the service, compared with just 5% of boys the same age. Much of this is driven by the oldest girls (ages 15 to 17) of whom 27% report using Tumblr. Overall, older teens are modestly more likely to use Tumblr than younger teens, with 10% of 13- to 14-year-olds and 16% of 15- to 17-year-olds using it.

23% of Teen Girls Use Tumblr

Facebook is used most often by the bulk of teens, but access varies, based on family income

Facebook, Instagram and Snapchat Used Most Often by American Teens

When asked to rank social media sites by their frequency of use, Facebook is the platform that teens report that they use most often, with 41% of youth saying they use it most. Instagram is the next most often used social media platform, with 20% of teens saying they use it most often. Fully 11% of teens say Snapchat is the social site they use most, and another 6% say Twitter.

The data shows a split in social media use by socio-economic status. Less well-off teens from families earning less than $30,000 annually remain more connected to Facebook, with 51% saying they use it most, compared with 38% of teens from wealthier families. More well-to-do teens instead are significantly more likely than the least well-off teens to say they visit Snapchat most, with 14% of those from families earning more than $75,000 saying Snapchat is their top social media platform, compared with 7% of teens whose families earn less than $30,000 annually. There is a similar pattern by income around Twitter, with the wealthiest teens shifting to Twitter more than their least well-to-do peers.

Split in Social Media Used Most Often by Household Income

The youngest teens — the 13-year-olds — divide their loyalties between Facebook and Instagram, with a bit more than a quarter of teens this age reporting they use each of these platforms most often. Teens 14 and older are more likely to have Facebook as their most often visited site. Indeed the youngest girls (ages 13 and 14) are the most likely to report using Instagram most often of any age/gender group, with 31% reporting Instagram as their most often visited platform.

Boys are more likely than girls to give Facebook as their most visited site, with 45% of boys reporting that, compared with 36% of teen girls. Girls are more likely than boys to report Instagram as their most often visited site, with 23% of girls and 17% of boys saying it is their most visited platform. Older teens are more likely than younger teens to list Facebook, Snapchat and Twitter as their most often visited platforms, though for Snapchat this is driven by great use among 15- to 17-year-old girls. Urban teens are most likely to say they visit Facebook most often, while suburban teens report visiting Instagram more than their urban peers.

Many teens ho use multiple online social network sites report “some” overlap in their online personal social networks

Lower Income Teens More Likely to Have the Same Friends Across Multiple Social Media Platforms

When asked to think about how much overlap they have with various friends on the different social networks they use, the largest group of teens who use multiple social media platforms report that there is “some” overlap in their friends on the different sites. More than half (57%) of teens describe their networks as having some overlap across sites. Another three-in-ten teens (29%) have tight networks — reporting that their networks are composed of the same people on every social site they visit. And 9% say there is “not a lot” of overlap in their friends across social media sites. Another 4% of teens are compartmentalizers, who report no overlap of friends across the social sites they visit.

Teens who use more than one social media platform and come from households earning less than $75,000 per year are more likely to say they have the same friends across all of their networks, with 35% of teens in these income brackets reporting the same friends, compared with 23% of teens from the wealthiest homes. Teens from higher income households (earning $50,000 and above) are substantially more likely to report that they have some overlap among friends across their different social networks, with 61% reporting some overlap, compared with 48% of those earning less. Teens from households that earn less than $50,ooo a year are more likely than wealthier teens to report that they have completely compartmentalized their social network platforms, with no overlap of friends across the different sites they use. Fully 7% of households earning less than $50,000 say they have no overlap in friends, compared with 2% of teens from families that earn more.

[Source: Pew Research]

XXX World 5: Porn Stats for Italy

Insights-Italy-1
It’s been said that Italy has more masterpieces per square mile than any country in the world, so the Pornhub statisticians decided to see for themselves. Turns out it’s true! After the success of the previous article one year ago,  while excavating this historic land for all of its porn related data as a part of a special collab with our friends over at fanpage.it, PornHub Insight Team found that the country credited for having invented the thermometer really knows how to heat things up. Aside from all of the museums and ancient architecture, Italy really stuns when it comes to how they get down with the best site in the world. Let’s boot on over!
(Clicca qui per leggere  l’articolo in Italiano – Click here to read in Italian)

Like a fine Vino

Over 60% of Italy’s national income comes from tourism, which makes sense given that it is the 4th most visited country in the world. The country ranks high on Pornhub’s list too, in that they rank 7th for most visitors to Pornhub. It’s nice to see that Pornhub is so popular in the country credited for bringing us game changing inventions like pizza or the piano. Speaking of which, it should also be noted that Italian is widely known as the language of music in that words like lentissimo and staccato are used for music direction. In regards to the amount of time that the average Italian user spends on Pornhub, the 8 minute and 19 second session is rather rapido when compared to the international 9:16 average length.pornhub-insights-italy-quick-statsAccording to our anonymized demographics data provided by our analytics software, 20% of Pornhub visitors in Italy are female, which is 3 percentage points below the international 23% proportion. Seems like a bit of a pepperoni party, join the fun ladies of Italy! The birthplace of pizza does impress us with their top viewed category, which is a nod towards their ability to appreciate that things tend to get better with age. The Mature category tops off the list, followed by Teen and then a little further down in 5th, Big Tits, inspired perhaps by the fact that 80% of the country’s terrain is hilly or mountainous. Comparatively, nearby Croatia also appreciates a slightly older crowd with regards to their top viewed categories, with MILF coming in first and Mature coming in second, though in countries like theCzech Republic and the USA, Teen reigns supreme. Let’s jump back to Italy’s affinity with age for a second though.pornhub-insights-italy-age-trafficAs we reported on our post pertaining to age demographics, as people grow older, they tend to watch porn that is more representative of themselves. Depicted above is a breakdown of Italy’s Pornhub viewers by age, compared to the worldwide proportions. As we can see, Italy has higher numbers of viewers in older categories, which likely has to do with why the Mature category is so popular. Comparatively, in countries like India which has a much higher proportion of younger viewers, the Teen category ranks considerably higher than Mature.

Paisan Pride

We’ve seen it before and we’ll see it again; in virtually every country Pornhub has profiled, the top searches tend to relate to that country’s nationality. People in countries like Croatia, the Czech Republic and Brazil tend to search for their own countrymen (and women) the most, and Italy very much follows suit. ‘Italian’ tops the list as the most searched term, followed a little further down by ‘italiana,’ ‘italia’ and ‘italiano’. We also see some mature themed searches towards the top of the list like ‘milf’ and ‘mom’ in second and third place respectively, which again likely has to do with the nation’s higher proportion of older viewers. The real kicker here is the prevalence of podiatry-related searches like ‘footjob’ and ‘feet’…then again the country is shaped like a giant boot so the fetish is understandable.pornhub-insights-italy-popular-searchesItaly is famous for it’s fashion houses. Labels like Valentino, Armani, Versace, Gucci and Prada are known for outfitting the world’s A-listers, but we’re a little more interested in which XXX-listers Italians most prefer to admire sans clothing. Industry goddess Lisa Ann (NSFW) claims the number one spot but Italy is one of the key European hubs for porn production and as such, is home to many popular performers who also rank highly. Take for instance stunner Valentina Nappi (NSFW) in at 2nd place or Sara Tommasi (NSFW)in third, with the most notorious Italian stallion of all, Rocco Siffredi (NSFW) taking 4th.pornhub-insights-italy-popular-pornstars

Regional Range

There are vast cultural differences from one region to another in the country, a fact which is also reflected in the considerable differences in lasting time from one area to the other. For instance, in Campania, the national 8:19 average time drops by a whopping 40 seconds. The region is however home to some of the most breathtaking sites in the world, namely the famed Amalfi Coast, Mount Vesuvius and the Island of Capri so it’s very well possible that the inhabitants are spending a little more time taking in the sights elsewhere than on Pornhub.pornhub-insights-italy-regional-durationOver in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, visits to Pornhub actually last an average of 14 seconds longer than 8:19, perhaps due to the fact that the region is understood as being a primary socioeconomic connector to Central and Eastern Europe due to it’s border-sharing location. That’s a lot of pressure, but there’ s no better way to beat stress than by an extended visit to Pornhub! Let’s take a look now at how the Holidays affect Pornhub traffic in the country.pornhub-insights-italy-holiday-trafficAs we saw in our 2014 Year in Review, New Year’s Eve is a major interrupter in terms of the effect that the holiday has on Pornhub traffic. The effect was especially prominent in European countries like Sweden and the Netherlandswhich each saw near 70% dips in traffic on average, though Italy isn’t very far behind with it’s considerable 59% drop. In our recent report on Pornhub traffic during Easter, Italy was proved to be one of the countries most affected by the holiday with it’s notable 27% drop, though it seems that Italians prefer to celebrate Liberation Day by spending a little more time on Pornhub as made evident by the slight 3% increase in traffic on this day.

Veni Vidi Device

We’ll close off with a look at which devices Italians prefer to peruse Pornhub with. Italy is on the same page with most of the rest of the world in terms of tablet use, in that they match the international 11% traffic proportion rate. They’re a little less into watching porn on their smartphones than the rest of the world as demonstrated by their higher rates for desktop usage and the lower proportion of traffic deriving from phone use. Overall, Italian traffic proportion rates closely resemble those of Spain, also in the Mediterranean.pornhub-insights-italy-device-trafficWith that we’ll say arrivederci to Italia! We’ll be back soon with more Insights, but feel free to give your two cents in the comments section below.

[Source: Pornhub Insights]

2015 Worldwide Trends and Data for Digital, Social and Mobile [Global + 30 Country Reports]

2015trends

The wonderful folks at GlobalWebIndex have been great partners to WeAreSocial over the years, most recently helping them to put together a superlative report on digital stats from around the world.

Look through We Are Social’s comprehensive new Digital, Social and Mobile Worldwide in 2015 report, and it’s clear why fast-growth markets are now so important to digital and social trends: regions such as APAC and LatAm contain online populations which are not only vast in size but which are growing at phenomenal year-on-year rates.

What’s more, GlobalWebIndex’s data shows that digital consumers in these fast-growth/emerging markets are some of the most engaged when it comes to online behaviour. They’ve been tracking the daily time that people spend on various forms of media since 2012; by asking 170,000 annual respondents how long they typically devote to the internet as well as online and offline forms of TV, press and radio, they’ve been able to build a detailed profile of daily media behaviors. The results show that the internet is capturing more and more of our time each day – with total hours spent online via PCs, laptops, mobiles and tablets growing from 5.55 in 2012 to 6.15 in 2014.

One of the drivers of this is still-increasing levels of engagement with social networks, which have climbed from a daily average of 1.61 to 1.72 hours over the period in question. This offers important food-for-thought given that some commentators still like to proclaim the “end of social networking”. In actual fact, we’re spending more time on networks now than in the earlier part of the decade – with the rise of the mobile internet, and the ability it affords us to connect to a still-widening range of networks at any time and from any location, being a major driver of this.

Time-Spent-Social-Networking-by-Country

Click image to enlarge: Average number of hours per day spent using social networks, by country. NB: GlobalWebIndex have calculated these average times using data for all internet users (including those who do not use social media at all), whereas the figures in We Are Social’s Digital, Social, & Mobile 2015 report are averages based on the same source data, but which do not include the data for non-social media users.

That said, engagement with social networking can vary significantly from country-to-country. Typically, it is highest in fast-growth/emerging nations where online populations are skewed towards young, urban and affluent demographics (all of these being characteristics which increase an individual’s likelihood of being a social networker).

The Philippines posts the highest figure of all (with a sizeable 3.42 hours), but LatAm countries follow very closely behind. It’s hardly a surprise that there’s a very strong correlation with usage of the mobile internet here; where the mobile web scores well, we typically see social networking accounting for large amounts of daily media time too.

At the other end of the spectrum, we find the lowest amounts of time being devoted to networks in a number of mature markets; here, internet penetration rates are normally very high, meaning the corresponding online populations have a much broader / higher age profile, and are more representative of the country’s total population.

In short, older segments are better represented in mature nations but are some of the least enthusiastic about social networking – something which has an obvious impact on national averages. Japan appears at the very bottom of the table, with just 0.30 hours spent on networking per day; the lack of enthusiasm for networks generally – and for Facebook in particular – are key local factors in this market. Behind this are other mature APAC markets such as Australia as well as most of the European countries tracked by GWI.

Given these geographic and demographic patterns, it’s hardly a surprise that internet users in fast-growth nations are also the biggest “multi-networkers” (those who maintain accounts on the highest number of social platforms). Indonesia tops the table here, with internet users typically being members of 7.39 networks, but it’s in China where people are most likely to actively use the greatest number of social networks (4.27 per internet user). That there are so many local platforms in China is a major contributor to this, as is the fact that leading global names such as Facebook are not as off-limits as is often assumed.

In some studies – especially those based on data from passively collected analytics – it’s still common to see Chinese usage of Facebook, Twitter and similar sites recorded as zero. This is a major mistake; there are in fact a number of ways that Chinese internet users are bypassing official restrictions on social networks, including accessing via apps (16% in China say that they have used the Facebook app in the last 30 days, and a look at the top apps being downloaded in China on a daily basis shows that Western social networks feature very prominently within the list).

Average-Number-of-Social-Networks-481x500

Click image to enlarge: Average number of active social media accounts maintained by internet users, broken down by age and by country.

Significantly, VPN (Virtual Private Network) apps are also being widely downloaded in China – with these tools representing the other major access route for those Chinese users looking to bypass official restrictions. Close to a fifth of online adults in China in fact say they’ve used a VPN in order to access restricted websites or social platforms.

Not only does this trend underline the potential limitations of using passively collected, geo-located data in isolation – which can over-estimate the size of social audiences in markets such as the USA, Netherlands, South Korea and Sweden, where VPN and Proxy servers tend to be located – it also emphasizes the growing futility of attempting to prevent national audiences from accessing certain sites. Most clearly of all, though, it demonstrates why networking behaviors in China – as well as in many other fast-growth markets – are much more diversified and sophisticated than is often assumed.

[Source: We Are Social]

Mountain View wins the award for longest Online Porn sessions on average for an American city [XXX World 4]

Who-Lasts-Longest-Cover

The award for longest Pornhub sessions on average for an American city goes to Mountain View, CA where they somehow manage to last a marathoning 21 minutes per session

I still wonder why Cupertino’s cousins shows only a disappointing 8:58 stamina… maybe a side effect of “one Apple a day”?

Lets’ warm up this freezing traditional Xmas time with a brand new article from my XXX World section.

Who last the longest? And yes, there’s plenty of date for countries and cities all over the world!

Don’t be scared about the topic, it’s absolutely SFW.

Ever wonder how your lasting time compares to others around the world? The Pornhub statisticians have got you covered. As a part of a special collaboration with Gizmodo, we’ve got the dirt on the longest and shortest comings and goings on the world’s biggest porn site. The following infographic allows you to click through and see how long on average Porhub users around the world spend on the site by country and US state, as well as by city again on both the international and individual state levels. The data used was compiled over the Fall of 2014.

View the full sized infograph here

Who lasts the longest of them all? That honor goes to The Western Sahara up in North Africa, where visits last an impressive  16 minutes and 16 seconds on average. China and the Philippines also have some admirable lasting power, clocking in with 14:34 and 14:22 minute long sessions on average. Session lengths drop by around 60% comparatively when we head over the the Middle East, home to some of the shortest Pornhub visits in the world. Bottom 3 worldwide are Palestine, Iraq and Antarctica each only last around 5 minutes.

pornhub-who-lasts-longest-world

If you’ve ever been curious about how long some of the world’s major metropolises masturbation sessions tend to last, look no further than to this relevantly themed section of the interactive infograph. Sessions span a leisurely 13:58 minutes over in Kingston, Jamaica, and over in the US, Los Angeles lasts around 10 minutes and 44 seconds per session. The good times continue to last in Johannesburg, South Africa with visits lasting around 10:35, outlasting Canada’s capital of fap, Edmonton, clocking in at 10:27. Efficiency rules in Baghdad where sessions are the shortest on average in the world, generally lasting only 5:32. Tokyo only goes for around 6 and a half minutes while Istanbul lasts a mere 7:21 on average.

pornhub-who-lasts-longest-us

Over in the land of the free, visits to Pornhub never really dip under 9 minutes on average. In Arizona, where sessions are the shortest in the country on average at 9:21, they still have a noteworthy near 4 minute gain over Baghdad. Pornhub visits span the longest in Hawaii, where they go for around 11 and a half minutes on the regular as is the case in the Southeastern states of the country such as Georgia, Arkansas and Mississippi, where they tend to last around 11 minutes on the site. The award for longest Pornhub sessions on average for an American city goes to Mountain View, CA where they somehow manage to last a marathoning 21 minutes per session, which blows New York City’s average of 10:05 right out of the Hudson. NYC’s average time still more than doubles Plainview, Nebraska’s mere 4:37 average session duration.

That’s a wrap! Let us know what you think of these findings in the comments section below.

[Source: Pornhub Insights]

Social is more important than Search, bigger than most TV networks and deeply interconnected with Mobile

Although it is still relatively new as far as media entities go, BuzzFeed has become one of the leading new-media players, thanks in large part to its command of the social web, an ability to craft viral content and a large fan base among millennials. True to form, the company has created a visually-rich index of factsabout its size and reach — numbers which help explain how it was able to raise $50 million in a recent financing round.

As a caveat, it’s worth noting that the presentation is clearly designed to be a sales pitch for the company’s native advertising efforts, and so there are no links to or discussion of any of the data used to compile the charts. Most of the figures come courtesy of the site’s Google Analytics data, or from firms like Nielsen and comScore.

One of the core principles behind BuzzFeed is that social sharing is more important than search, so it’s no surprise that the main driver of traffic (which is estimated to be about 150 million unique visitors per month) is social — in fact, the company says that its social traffic is five times larger than its search traffic.

Search vs. Social2

Although social has grown to become one of the leading sources of traffic to most web content, the advertising industry still hasn’t quite caught up to this development, as shown by a BuzzFeed graph courtesy of eMarketer and Shareaholic — which says that social accounts for 30 percent of referral traffic but only 14 percent of advertising budgets.

Search vs. social

The other major shift in content consumption is mobile, and according to BuzzFeed the two are interconnected, in the sense that a majority of the site’s social traffic comes from mobile, and its share rates on mobile are twice as high as they are from its desktop users.

Mobile and social

BuzzFeed said mobile also accounts for a rapidly growing amount of video consumption, including 50 percent of all the video that the site produces, and this is particularly the case among millennial users. As a result of its focus on that market, BuzzFeed says that its reach is larger than several leading TV networks, including Fox, CNN and MTV — and among millennials it is larger still, putting the site ahead of most of the major networks, including NBC.

BuzzFeed reach

Obviously, BuzzFeed’s statistics are designed to promote its advertising appeal. And as with any form of web measurement, the sources it has chosen have their flaws — Google Analytics has a tendency to over-estimate certain kinds of traffic, while Nielsen and comScore have a tendency to under-estimate other kinds, including traffic from corporate networks (and BuzzFeed founder Jonah Peretti has said one of his secret weapons is the “bored at work” network).

Some of the conclusions suggested by the BuzzFeed numbers are also debatable: for example, some media analysts argue that social is not as good as search — even if the raw traffic number is larger — because search is a better indicator of purchasing intent. As for video views, TV insiders would no doubt argue that their viewership is more loyal than someone watching a viral video on their mobile device.

Those caveats aside, however, the numbers BuzzFeed is generating are still quite impressive for what is still a relatively young company.

[Source: GigaOM and BuzzFeed]

Free delivery is the most effective Online Purchase Driver, followed by Rewards and Customer Reviews

20141112_Purchase_motivatore_ecommerce_chart

As explored in the new GWI Commerce report, free delivery is the most effective online purchase driver. Of the 15 different options tracked by GWI, it’s this measure which scores the highest response globally – with 4 in 10 internet users saying it makes them more likely to purchase something online.
The power of free delivery is far from even across regions, though. It exerts its biggest impact in Europe and North America but is less important in a market like China (where internet users instead place the highest premium on customer reviews and feedback).
As the chart demonstrates, other important global motivators include:

  • Financial rewards such as coupons or discounts (35%)
  • Customer reviews (34%)
  • Loyalty points (29%)

For reviews, though, there’s a clear disconnect between supply and demand; from market to market, there are more people writing reviews than actively looking for them.

20141112_Purchase_motivatore_ecommerce

 

[Source: GlobalWebIndex]

Teens heavily use Facebook, Instagram more often than Snapchat

One of the most pressing questions about Facebook’s future revolves around teen usage. However, a new study by Forrester shows that maybe teens don’t hate Facebook after all.

Forrester surveyed more than 4,500 U.S. online users between 12 and 17 about their habits on social networks and apps. Among apps they use “all the time,” both Facebook and Instagram finished ahead dof Snapchat.

Nate Elliott, Forrester’s Vice President and Principal Analyst Serving Marketing Leadership Professionals,summed up the findings of the study in a blog post:

The results were clear: Facebook remains young users’ favorite social network. More than three-quarters of online youth use Facebook — twice as many as use Pinterest or Tumblr or Snapchat, and more than use Instagram and WhatApp combined. And 28% of young users who are on Facebook say they use it “all the time,” a higher percentage than said this about any other social network.The bottom line: The sky is not falling. Facebook does not have a problem attracting or retaining teen users.

Here’s a look at the graph, with different apps and social networks used by teens plotted in terms of adoption and hyperusage:

teensocialscatter

[Source: Inside Facebook]