XXX World 5: Porn Stats for Italy

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It’s been said that Italy has more masterpieces per square mile than any country in the world, so the Pornhub statisticians decided to see for themselves. Turns out it’s true! After the success of the previous article one year ago,  while excavating this historic land for all of its porn related data as a part of a special collab with our friends over at fanpage.it, PornHub Insight Team found that the country credited for having invented the thermometer really knows how to heat things up. Aside from all of the museums and ancient architecture, Italy really stuns when it comes to how they get down with the best site in the world. Let’s boot on over!
(Clicca qui per leggere  l’articolo in Italiano – Click here to read in Italian)

Like a fine Vino

Over 60% of Italy’s national income comes from tourism, which makes sense given that it is the 4th most visited country in the world. The country ranks high on Pornhub’s list too, in that they rank 7th for most visitors to Pornhub. It’s nice to see that Pornhub is so popular in the country credited for bringing us game changing inventions like pizza or the piano. Speaking of which, it should also be noted that Italian is widely known as the language of music in that words like lentissimo and staccato are used for music direction. In regards to the amount of time that the average Italian user spends on Pornhub, the 8 minute and 19 second session is rather rapido when compared to the international 9:16 average length.pornhub-insights-italy-quick-statsAccording to our anonymized demographics data provided by our analytics software, 20% of Pornhub visitors in Italy are female, which is 3 percentage points below the international 23% proportion. Seems like a bit of a pepperoni party, join the fun ladies of Italy! The birthplace of pizza does impress us with their top viewed category, which is a nod towards their ability to appreciate that things tend to get better with age. The Mature category tops off the list, followed by Teen and then a little further down in 5th, Big Tits, inspired perhaps by the fact that 80% of the country’s terrain is hilly or mountainous. Comparatively, nearby Croatia also appreciates a slightly older crowd with regards to their top viewed categories, with MILF coming in first and Mature coming in second, though in countries like theCzech Republic and the USA, Teen reigns supreme. Let’s jump back to Italy’s affinity with age for a second though.pornhub-insights-italy-age-trafficAs we reported on our post pertaining to age demographics, as people grow older, they tend to watch porn that is more representative of themselves. Depicted above is a breakdown of Italy’s Pornhub viewers by age, compared to the worldwide proportions. As we can see, Italy has higher numbers of viewers in older categories, which likely has to do with why the Mature category is so popular. Comparatively, in countries like India which has a much higher proportion of younger viewers, the Teen category ranks considerably higher than Mature.

Paisan Pride

We’ve seen it before and we’ll see it again; in virtually every country Pornhub has profiled, the top searches tend to relate to that country’s nationality. People in countries like Croatia, the Czech Republic and Brazil tend to search for their own countrymen (and women) the most, and Italy very much follows suit. ‘Italian’ tops the list as the most searched term, followed a little further down by ‘italiana,’ ‘italia’ and ‘italiano’. We also see some mature themed searches towards the top of the list like ‘milf’ and ‘mom’ in second and third place respectively, which again likely has to do with the nation’s higher proportion of older viewers. The real kicker here is the prevalence of podiatry-related searches like ‘footjob’ and ‘feet’…then again the country is shaped like a giant boot so the fetish is understandable.pornhub-insights-italy-popular-searchesItaly is famous for it’s fashion houses. Labels like Valentino, Armani, Versace, Gucci and Prada are known for outfitting the world’s A-listers, but we’re a little more interested in which XXX-listers Italians most prefer to admire sans clothing. Industry goddess Lisa Ann (NSFW) claims the number one spot but Italy is one of the key European hubs for porn production and as such, is home to many popular performers who also rank highly. Take for instance stunner Valentina Nappi (NSFW) in at 2nd place or Sara Tommasi (NSFW)in third, with the most notorious Italian stallion of all, Rocco Siffredi (NSFW) taking 4th.pornhub-insights-italy-popular-pornstars

Regional Range

There are vast cultural differences from one region to another in the country, a fact which is also reflected in the considerable differences in lasting time from one area to the other. For instance, in Campania, the national 8:19 average time drops by a whopping 40 seconds. The region is however home to some of the most breathtaking sites in the world, namely the famed Amalfi Coast, Mount Vesuvius and the Island of Capri so it’s very well possible that the inhabitants are spending a little more time taking in the sights elsewhere than on Pornhub.pornhub-insights-italy-regional-durationOver in Friuli-Venezia Giulia, visits to Pornhub actually last an average of 14 seconds longer than 8:19, perhaps due to the fact that the region is understood as being a primary socioeconomic connector to Central and Eastern Europe due to it’s border-sharing location. That’s a lot of pressure, but there’ s no better way to beat stress than by an extended visit to Pornhub! Let’s take a look now at how the Holidays affect Pornhub traffic in the country.pornhub-insights-italy-holiday-trafficAs we saw in our 2014 Year in Review, New Year’s Eve is a major interrupter in terms of the effect that the holiday has on Pornhub traffic. The effect was especially prominent in European countries like Sweden and the Netherlandswhich each saw near 70% dips in traffic on average, though Italy isn’t very far behind with it’s considerable 59% drop. In our recent report on Pornhub traffic during Easter, Italy was proved to be one of the countries most affected by the holiday with it’s notable 27% drop, though it seems that Italians prefer to celebrate Liberation Day by spending a little more time on Pornhub as made evident by the slight 3% increase in traffic on this day.

Veni Vidi Device

We’ll close off with a look at which devices Italians prefer to peruse Pornhub with. Italy is on the same page with most of the rest of the world in terms of tablet use, in that they match the international 11% traffic proportion rate. They’re a little less into watching porn on their smartphones than the rest of the world as demonstrated by their higher rates for desktop usage and the lower proportion of traffic deriving from phone use. Overall, Italian traffic proportion rates closely resemble those of Spain, also in the Mediterranean.pornhub-insights-italy-device-trafficWith that we’ll say arrivederci to Italia! We’ll be back soon with more Insights, but feel free to give your two cents in the comments section below.

[Source: Pornhub Insights]

How to Download a Copy of Your Google Search History

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Google now allows you to download a copy of your Google search history, and it only takes a minute.

While Google has always made it possible to easily see your search history online, this is different — Google’s new tool will send you a downloadable archive of your search history, which can be stored offline.

You can download all of your saved search history to see a list of the terms you’ve searched for. This gives you access to your data when and where you want.

  1. Visit your Web & App Activity page.
  2. In the top right corner of the page, click the Options icon  > Download.
  3. Click Create Archive.
  4. When the download is complete, you’ll get an email confirmation with a link to the data.

[Source: Business Insider]

Why People Unfollow Brands On Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn?

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The folks at BuzzStream and Fractl conducted a survey with more than 900 respondents to better understand why people unfollow brands on social networks. And the infographic below, titled The Unfollow Algorithm, illustrates what they found.

Here’s are some key highlights:

  • On Facebook, 25 percent said that they unfollowed a brand’s official social media account in the last month.
  • On Twitter, 12 percent of Tweeters said that they unfollowed a brand in the last few days.
  • 49 percent said that they never unfollow brands on LinkedIn.
  • 21 percent said they will unfollow a brand if the content is repetitive and boring.
  • 19 percent said they will unfollow a brand on Facebook if it posts too frequently (more than 6 times per day).
  • 22 percent of the respondents said that “images” is the most preferred content type posted by brands.

Check out the infographic below for more insights.

20150317_Unfollow_Algorithm

[Source: Social Media Today]

Welcome Cinemagraph: the new fascinating visual trend that will change Advertising and Marketing

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What if there were an ad that you just couldn’t draw your eyes from? It’s oddly captivating, almost hypnotic, and it would halt your thumb from scrolling farther down your Facebook feed.

There’s one such creative format that is only now catching on as the digital world’s equivalent of the glossy magazine ad: cinemagraphs. And Facebook, along with its mobile photo network Instagram, wants more brands to try them out as it quietly introduces advertisers to the potential of this half-video, half-photograph style, according to digital marketing insiders.

“You’re going to start seeing a ton of these on Facebook,” said one advertising executive who has seen a guide produced by Facebook for marketers called “Hacking Facebook Autoplay.”

Cinemagraphs have been around for a few years, made popular by two artists well-known in ad circles, Kevin Burg and Jamie Beck (who created the Armani eyeglasses image above). The format is a type of GIF, a photo in which only a piece of the image subtly moves.

A cinemagraph created for Balenciaga by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

 

The style has been used in ads on Tumblr created by Burg and Beck, and now Facebook is giving it a whirl.

“Because of autoplay, brands need to be doing more with this stuff,” the ad exec noted. “This is something that plays out with motion in the feed that’s cool.”

Some brands already have shared cinemagraph-style posts to Facebook, including Stouffer’s and Coca-Cola. One of the common uses is to depict steam wafting off a hot dish, for instance.

Facebook has only been able to support such creative because of its autoplaying video, which sets images in motion without users having to click a button. “Advertisers buy it just like video,” the ad insider explained.

A cinemagraph created at Inkaterra La Casona by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

Just last week, Facebook updated Instagram to allow videos to play on a loop, which could help brands post cinemagraphs there because they are set to constantly repeat.

Burg and Beck have done Tumblr ads for Saks Fifth Avenue and Lincoln Motor Co. It’s helped luxury brands like Chopard with creating cinemagraphs for organic social campaigns.

The duo said they were just playing around when they discovered this idea of “isolated motion,” Burg said in a phone interview this week.

They thought the format would be ideal for advertising. “People can’t stop staring at them,” Burg said. “Isn’t that what advertisers want?”

A third of the projects they do with brands include cinemagraphs, and the artist agreed that their clients are just now planning how to get them on Facebook and Instagram.

A cinemagraph created for Ecco Domani by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio.

 

Burg and Beck have even talked with Facebook’s team to consult on projects because of how complicated the format is. It could take weeks in production to create a cinemagraph, they said.

“We’ve had all kinds of new inquiries [from brands],” Beck said. “They don’t want video that’s so noisy; they want a cinemagraph because it has more elegance.”

A cinemagraph created for Lincoln by Burg and Beck’s Ann Street Studio

[Source: Adweek]

2015 Worldwide Trends and Data for Digital, Social and Mobile [Global + 30 Country Reports]

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The wonderful folks at GlobalWebIndex have been great partners to WeAreSocial over the years, most recently helping them to put together a superlative report on digital stats from around the world.

Look through We Are Social’s comprehensive new Digital, Social and Mobile Worldwide in 2015 report, and it’s clear why fast-growth markets are now so important to digital and social trends: regions such as APAC and LatAm contain online populations which are not only vast in size but which are growing at phenomenal year-on-year rates.

What’s more, GlobalWebIndex’s data shows that digital consumers in these fast-growth/emerging markets are some of the most engaged when it comes to online behaviour. They’ve been tracking the daily time that people spend on various forms of media since 2012; by asking 170,000 annual respondents how long they typically devote to the internet as well as online and offline forms of TV, press and radio, they’ve been able to build a detailed profile of daily media behaviors. The results show that the internet is capturing more and more of our time each day – with total hours spent online via PCs, laptops, mobiles and tablets growing from 5.55 in 2012 to 6.15 in 2014.

One of the drivers of this is still-increasing levels of engagement with social networks, which have climbed from a daily average of 1.61 to 1.72 hours over the period in question. This offers important food-for-thought given that some commentators still like to proclaim the “end of social networking”. In actual fact, we’re spending more time on networks now than in the earlier part of the decade – with the rise of the mobile internet, and the ability it affords us to connect to a still-widening range of networks at any time and from any location, being a major driver of this.

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Click image to enlarge: Average number of hours per day spent using social networks, by country. NB: GlobalWebIndex have calculated these average times using data for all internet users (including those who do not use social media at all), whereas the figures in We Are Social’s Digital, Social, & Mobile 2015 report are averages based on the same source data, but which do not include the data for non-social media users.

That said, engagement with social networking can vary significantly from country-to-country. Typically, it is highest in fast-growth/emerging nations where online populations are skewed towards young, urban and affluent demographics (all of these being characteristics which increase an individual’s likelihood of being a social networker).

The Philippines posts the highest figure of all (with a sizeable 3.42 hours), but LatAm countries follow very closely behind. It’s hardly a surprise that there’s a very strong correlation with usage of the mobile internet here; where the mobile web scores well, we typically see social networking accounting for large amounts of daily media time too.

At the other end of the spectrum, we find the lowest amounts of time being devoted to networks in a number of mature markets; here, internet penetration rates are normally very high, meaning the corresponding online populations have a much broader / higher age profile, and are more representative of the country’s total population.

In short, older segments are better represented in mature nations but are some of the least enthusiastic about social networking – something which has an obvious impact on national averages. Japan appears at the very bottom of the table, with just 0.30 hours spent on networking per day; the lack of enthusiasm for networks generally – and for Facebook in particular – are key local factors in this market. Behind this are other mature APAC markets such as Australia as well as most of the European countries tracked by GWI.

Given these geographic and demographic patterns, it’s hardly a surprise that internet users in fast-growth nations are also the biggest “multi-networkers” (those who maintain accounts on the highest number of social platforms). Indonesia tops the table here, with internet users typically being members of 7.39 networks, but it’s in China where people are most likely to actively use the greatest number of social networks (4.27 per internet user). That there are so many local platforms in China is a major contributor to this, as is the fact that leading global names such as Facebook are not as off-limits as is often assumed.

In some studies – especially those based on data from passively collected analytics – it’s still common to see Chinese usage of Facebook, Twitter and similar sites recorded as zero. This is a major mistake; there are in fact a number of ways that Chinese internet users are bypassing official restrictions on social networks, including accessing via apps (16% in China say that they have used the Facebook app in the last 30 days, and a look at the top apps being downloaded in China on a daily basis shows that Western social networks feature very prominently within the list).

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Click image to enlarge: Average number of active social media accounts maintained by internet users, broken down by age and by country.

Significantly, VPN (Virtual Private Network) apps are also being widely downloaded in China – with these tools representing the other major access route for those Chinese users looking to bypass official restrictions. Close to a fifth of online adults in China in fact say they’ve used a VPN in order to access restricted websites or social platforms.

Not only does this trend underline the potential limitations of using passively collected, geo-located data in isolation – which can over-estimate the size of social audiences in markets such as the USA, Netherlands, South Korea and Sweden, where VPN and Proxy servers tend to be located – it also emphasizes the growing futility of attempting to prevent national audiences from accessing certain sites. Most clearly of all, though, it demonstrates why networking behaviors in China – as well as in many other fast-growth markets – are much more diversified and sophisticated than is often assumed.

[Source: We Are Social]