The Selfie phenomenon: a brand new research and how a selfie just become the most-retweeted tweet of all time

Oxford Dictionary’s word of the year is also one of the most fascinating movements in social is that of the selfie. Part vanity, part communication, part fun, and part absurdity, selfies represent a new generation of #selfieexpression cum egotistical emoticons…but not necessarily in a bad way. Nevertheless, the psychology and science behind selfies are strangely fascinating and therefore I continue to study and report on its evolution.

Selfiecity, a new research project, studies Instagram data from five cities around the world including Bangkok, Berlin, Moscow, New York, and Sao Paulo. Wired initially reported on Selfiecity’s initial findings. I didn’t want to be selfie’ish with the information so, I’m sharing the highlights with you here.

Right now, there are more than 79 million pictures on Instagram with the hashtag #selfie. You can add another 7 million for #selfies and 1 million for #selfienation. Not counted though, are the number of selfies that don’t include a meta reference beyond the visual that you are indeed looking at a selfie.

Fantastic_Infographics__Drawn_From_A_Study_of_Instagram_Selfies___Wired_Design___Wired_com_2

As you can see, selfies is a form of communication among the (early) twenty somethings.

Fantastic_Infographics__Drawn_From_A_Study_of_Instagram_Selfies___Wired_Design___Wired_com_3

Specifically in NY, more women (61.6%) share selfies than men (36.7%). But then again, there are historically more women active on social media than men as well. The average age for selfie-made women in NY is 23.3 whereas the age skews slightly higher for men at 26.7.

Fantastic_Infographics__Drawn_From_A_Study_of_Instagram_Selfies___Wired_Design___Wired_com_1

I know this is a burning issue for everyone concerned here. Selfiecity also tracked visual cues such as angle of head tilt. Women in Sao Paulo as you can see, were the most expressive with body position and tilt at 17-degrees compared to 10.6-degrees in Bangkok and 11-degrees in New York.

Selfiexploratory

But wait, that’s not all Selfiecity is tracking. You can learn more about poses, the state of eye contact, how many people where glasses, and whether or not people open or close their eyes and mouth in selfies.

In summary:

#noglasses

and…

Eyes wide open…mouth wide shut.

Fantastic_Infographics__Drawn_From_A_Study_of_Instagram_Selfies___Wired_Design___Wired_com

I found this part particularly interesting. Selfiecity is also tracking the mood in each selfie. For the most part, people are happy, which hopefully conveys a positive sense of selfie-esteem or selfie-confidence ;)

In short, women are clearly smiling more than men. I guess that says something…

Additionally the team at Selfiecity learned…

On average, women tend to take more selfies than men. In Moscow, women account for 80% of the selfies. Yet, as people get older, this trend reverses. At or after age 40, men are more likely to take and post selfies than women.

At 150%, women are more likely to tilt their heads in photos over men.

According to Selfiecity’s mood analysis, people in Bangkok and Sao Paulo appear to be happier than people in Moscow. Perhaps it’s just that they’re more selfie-satisfied.

Truth is, yesterday we witnessed a new chapter in selfie’s history as Ellen Degeneres took an amazing shot during Oscar’s night and shared it on Twitter asking the world to make it the “most retweeted selfie” ever.

And she made it in almos no time: the retweets quickly added up. Within 30 minutes it was nearing Barack Obama’s record of 778,800.

Bhxev-iIEAA5AJw

Then, a few minutes later, it happened. Within the hour, the tweet would go on to surpass one million retweets, making it far and beyond the most-retweeted tweet of all time.

But, even though Samsung was all over this  (and the all Academy Awards), backstage, she’s using an Apple product. #EpicFail?

You’ll be telling your grandkids about this one, folks. At least until next year’s Oscars.

[Source: Brian Solis & Mashable]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s