Define your Online Video Strategy: Facebook Vs. YouTube

Video Strategy Title

If it were five years in the future, would you be reading this article or would you be watching it? As online video continues its inimitable rise, it’s an interesting question to ponder.

Just take a moment to read these statements:

With online video quickly becoming a key means for people to satisfy their information and entertainment needs, businesses that fail to include it in their digital strategies will do so at their peril.

So here comes the tricky questions, where should you publish your video?

Well, let’s start from the end, the viewers. You want viewers, right? And a lot of viewers make a lot of views… Well, the problem is that when it comes to define a view, there’s no consistency across online platforms.

Here’s a rundown:

Views Table

Ok ok, I’m here to suggest solutions, not to create confusion. While I was developing this chart, I thought that a quick POV about online video strategy could be of interest for a lot of you guys.

But, I have neither the time nor the inclination to write a whitepaper or record a video (pardon my english humor). So I thought “An infographic should be easy and fast to consume!”.

And here we are: there’s no discussion that the main players for videos are Facebook and YouTube, that’s why  I structured my visual as a comparison between the two platforms… eventually providing my recommended approach for your online videos!

As always… shoot me your feedback and comments. See you soon, I have to work on my Xmas video! ;-)

Online Video Strategy

Online Video Strategy – Facebook vs YouTube

[Additional Source: The Guardian]

Why do people uninstall apps?

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Why Do People Uninstall Apps? Well according to ITR, a company that specialises in translation and localization services for software applications, the most overwhelming reason for uninstalling apps is that they take up too much space!

The infographic covers:

  • how long we keep apps for
  • why apps are being uninstalled
  • the 8 most common design mistakes
  • the difference between the Apple store and Google Play

[Source: ITR International Translation Resources]

How much should you spend on Sales and Marketing?

The Corporate Marketing and Sales Spend Landscape is an infographic about publicly traded companies and how much revenue they spend on sales & marketing. The general rule of thumb, based off of a 2014 Gartner Research study, is that a company should invest 10% of their revenue into marketing. However, a 2014 CMO survey, published by the American Marketing Association and Duke University, came to find that the 10% rule isn’t true for all types of companies.

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Mobile Browser has the reach, Apps have the engagement. So, who’s winning?

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Last month, comScore released its Mobile App Report (see this amazing article by Marketing Land). The report contained many interesting findings, but its big takeaway was this:

There’s a divergence between reach and engagement.

  • The desktop and mobile Web have much greater audience.
  • Consumers spend the majority of their mobile time with a very few heavily used apps.

As the chart below indicates, the desktop is not dead: usage has grown since 2013. But that growth is modest compared with mobile.
comscore Mobile apps report

Sixty-two percent of all digital media time is now mobile, and the majority of that is in apps, which recently surpassed TV. By contrast, time spent on the desktop has plummeted to 38 percent from 49 percent since 2013.

comscore Mobile apps report

What’s interesting here is the concentration of time in apps (nearly 90 percent of mobile time) compared with their more limited audience size. The mobile Web has a much larger audience, though one that’s much less engaged.

comscore Mobile apps report

Morgan Stanley recently presented its additional findings in a research note that plays up mobile browser usage.

Characterizing the browser as the ultimate mobile app, the firm cites its own research and comScore data for the proposition that “US mobile browser audiences are 2X larger than app audiences across the top 50 mobile web properties and have grown 1.2X faster over the past 3 years.”

Mobile web vs. app traffic for top 50 mobile properties

mobile web vs. app traffic

Source: Morgan Stanley rendering of comScore data

The research note is designed to combat the perception that the mobile Web is anemic or in decline (and by extension, Google). It’s not. As the data show, mobile browser usage is growing faster than apps and delivering larger audiences for most publishers.

Morgan Stanley points out that only 12 of the top 50 mobile properties have more traffic coming from apps than the browser. The discussion argues for the primacy of the mobile browser for most publishers, brands and marketers.

As a practical matter, Morgan Stanley is absolutely correct. Most publishers will see the bulk of their traffic from mobile browser usage and not apps. The reason isn’t because the browser is somehow superior or that the “open internet must win.” The browser drives more traffic because consumers are highly selective about apps.

Mobile app traffic exceeds the browser in only a few cases

Mobile traffic apps vs. mobile web

Source: Morgan Stanley, comScore

Because of smartphone memory constraints and the mediocre quality of most apps, users are only going to download and engage with a small fraction of the apps on the market. For example, I may have one or two retailer apps on my phone (e.g., Amazon), though I shop at many more stores. My choices are tied to frequency and loyalty; I’m not going to download 10 different retail apps. Instead, I’ll use search and the browser to find information from retailers I’m more casually invested in.

Unable to deliver compelling experiences and disappointed by a lack of traction, many retailers have turned away from apps and toward the mobile Web. It’s also becoming more costly to acquire app users who may quickly churn anyway. (Here the positions of Google and Facebook are reversed, with Google positioning itself as the lower-cost alternative for app-install ads.)

It’s important to be clear that mobile apps aren’t appropriate for every merchant or marketer. The apps vs. mobile browser discussion is really about audience segmentation and user behavior patterns. As a crude generalization, the browser is for more casual audiences and apps are for more frequent and loyal customers.

I think this apps vs. browser argument is so charged partly because it’s a surrogate for Apple’s and Google’s competing visions for the mobile internet. These dueling positions have zealous detractors and partisans.

Putting aside “ideology,” marketers need to have a clear view of what approach makes the most sense for them based on a realistic understanding of the customer and her behavior and usage patterns.

It’s time to end the browser vs. apps “or” debate; it’s really about “and”.

[Source: Marketing Land]

The Science of Instagram

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If you want to see data like this about your account specifically, check out the Instagram analytics tool released by Dan Zarella: PicStats.com

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I do believe the story of the present and near-future of social media is visual content. From the impact of images and video on Facebook and Twitter to the new crop of media-centric social platforms like Instagram and Pinterest, it’s clear that inbound marketers need to be turning out great visual content.

These are the findings Dan shared, after collecting a large Instagram database and analyzing it to identify the characteristics that make images work (or not work).

If you’re curious about the nerdy details of the dataset, there are details at the bottom of it.

[Source: Dan Zarrella]

The State of the Social Marketing Team 2015

Many companies are still trying to figure out how to tackle social media. They’re constantly asking themselves questions like, “Where should social media live in our organization?,” “How big should my team be?,” or “How should our social media team be built?”

To help address this common issue, Simply Measured surveyed over 350 social media marketers about their team structures and compiled their findings into this infographic! More information from the survey (as well as a separate look at the pain points these marketers face), download a complimentary copy of their 2015 State of Social Marketing Report.

SimplyMeasured-the-state-of-the-social-media-team-2015

6 New Facebook Features for Business Pages

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Thanks to Social Media Examiner for this amazing article!

#1: Encourage Your Fans to Use the See First Option

Facebook now allows people to customize their news feed to prioritize updates from particular friends, groups and pages. This is great news for pages with good content, so fans can prioritize your posts.

Educate your audience on how to select to see your posts first in their news feed. There are a couple of ways to access the See First option.

The easiest way is to go directly to your Facebook page, click the Liked button and then select the See First option.

see first from page option

The easiest way to access Facebook’s See First setting is on the page itself.

Another option is to go to the full customization options (people, pages and groups) from desktop or mobile devices. To access it from a desktop, select the down arrow on the far right to get to News Feed Preferences.

access news feed preferences

Select News Feed Preferences from your menu in the upper-right corner.

Next, navigate down to Pages. Then view the pages you’ve seen most recently and click the tab to list the pages in alphabetical order. Click the Following button to customize those you want to see first.

news feed preferences

To customize your news feed preferences, click Following on the pages you want to see first.

This video will walk you through the desktop and mobile customization process.

When you have good content, people will want to see your Facebook business page posts in their news feed first. Tell fans how to add your page to their See First list, so you make sure they do.

#2: Check Out Upgrades to Facebook Conversion Tracking

If you’re using website conversion ads or website retargeting, then you already know there are two types of pixels you place on your website to track these events and custom audiences. Facebook recently announced a new custom audience pixel that combines these features into one pixel, which will help with tracking and speed, so the stats are more accurate.

Your current conversion pixels will continue to work, but eventually you should migrate to the new upgraded code. This involves placing the new code on your website, adding some code on specific pages you want to track and then removing the old pixels. Facebook’s post explains the process and gives you the exact steps to change to the new custom audience pixel.

pixel code changes

The new pixel code will replace the previous one. It will be faster and more accurate.

This is still in the rollout phase. Toward the end of Jon Loomer’s post about the upgraded pixel, he explains how to determine if your account has the new pixel enabled.

Ultimately the upgraded pixel will be good for marketers who are using custom audiences and conversion pixels with their Facebook ads, since it gives more accurate stats in reports.

#3: Get a Facebook Beacon for Your Local Business

The Facebook Beacon is a device you put in your local business that sends information to people who are on Facebook near you and have Bluetooth turned on.

Send people a welcome message with a photo, recommendations from their friends who have visited the store, a prompt to check in and more.

facebook beacon post

The Facebook Beacon boosts the visibility of your local business to nearby mobile users.

The Beacon device is free. All you need to do is request one from Facebook for your local page. It’s an excellent way to increase the visibility of your local business to people who are using Facebook nearby.

#4: Send and Receive Money on Facebook

Earlier this year, Facebook started rolling out the ability to send money between friends through the Messenger app only to users in the United States. This service will rival Google Wallet and make it easier for people to make “in-app” purchases on Facebook in the future. In the meantime, if your friends are clients, they can pay you through the Messenger app.

You can only use the Messenger mobile app with a debit card on file, not credit cards. Just click the dollar sign to get started.

send money option in facebook messenger

From Facebook Messenger you can send money to Facebook friends at no charge.

You can also use the desktop version to send money, but the icon is a little more hidden. It only appears when you open the message outside of the inbox.

send money option in facebook desktop

The desktop Facebook app also allows you to send money.

Facebook made this service available without a service charge, so there’s a benefit to using it over a service like PayPal, for example. However, as mentioned above, there are limitations: it’s only in the United States, you must be friends with the person and it’s debit card only.

#5: Create Saved Replies for Your Page

Saved Replies isn’t an earth-shattering change, but it can save precious time if you have a standard message you frequently send. Note: this feature is still rolling out.

To access your saved replies, first navigate to the Messages area of your page.

facebook messages tab

Access Saved Replies in the Messages area of your page.

To see Saved Replies, click on a particular message. The message will appear in a pop-up box and the Saved Replies will be on the left sidebar. From there, select Manage Replies to see all of the replies you’ve created or create a new reply. You can even search replies by keyword.

facebook saved message

Click on the message on your Facebook page, then select Manage Replies or Create New Reply.

Create generic replies for all of your frequently asked questions. Thencustomize them before sending them out.

facebook saved reply

Save a reply that you use often to save you time, and then take a moment to customize it.

Any new saved reply will be available to you in your Facebook Messages area.

This feature is currently only available for pages that have their Message button enabled.

#6: Watch for Lead Ads

Facebook is testing new lead ads that make it easier than ever to fill in contact information on mobile devices. If mobile users respond to an ad for something like a newsletter, business information, free report or follow-up call, they can submit their contact information (email address or phone number) with just two taps of a button.

facebook lead ads

Mobile users will easily be able to give you contact information.

Currently lead ads are only available for select businesses in closed beta testing.

Facebook is putting precautions in place to make sure this service isn’t abused. They are complying with the lead ads terms of service to ensure only page admins are able to export the .CSV with the lead information.

We will keep you posted when this feature is available on a wider scale.

Over to You

As marketers, it’s important to keep on top of all Facebook changes. While not all of these features have been rolled out yet, you can get a sense of what’s coming, as well as what trends may pop up in the future.

Use these new features to increase your business’s visibility and better connect with your customers, as well as to spark ideas of how you can improve your business flow and your marketing.

What do you think? What new Facebook features are you most excited about? Which ones are you already using? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

[Source: Social Media Examiner]